© 2023 by Lawyer & Lawyer.Proudly created with Wix.com

FOLLOW US:

  • w-facebook
  • Twitter Clean
Please reload

Recent Posts

Shelter Now Rally Coverage

December 6, 2017

1/1
Please reload

Featured Posts

CUSH, others push ‘driver cards’ for undocumented immigrants

August 28, 2015

From Kenosha News: http://www.kenoshanews.com/news/cush-others-push-driver-cards-for-undocumented-immigrants/article_26b48919-12fe-590d-8cc4-3d966cbc7329.html

 

  • BY BILL GUIDA

    • Aug 28, 2015

State Rep. JoCasta Zamarippa, D-Milwaukee, left, is welcomed by Linda Boyle, of the Racine Interfaith Coalition, to a rally Friday in Lincoln Park held by RIC and Kenosha\'s Congregations United to Serve Humanity to support a bill authored by Zamarippa and co-sponsored by Rep. Todd Ohnstad, D-Kenosha. It would allow undocumented immigrants to obtain drivers cards, permitting them to drive legally and buy insurance.

 

 

State Rep. JoCasta Zamarippa, D-Milwaukee, left, is welcomed by Linda Boyle, of the Racine Interfaith Coalition, to a rally Friday in Lincoln Park held by RIC and Kenosha\'s Congregations United to Serve Humanity to support a bill authored by Zamarippa and co-sponsored by Rep. Todd Ohnstad, D-Kenosha. It would allow undocumented immigrants to obtain drivers cards, permitting them to drive legally and buy insurance.

 

 

Supporters calling for a Wisconsin law allowing undocumented immigrants to obtain “driver cards,” rallied Friday in Lincoln Park.

Kenosha’s Congregations United to Serve Humanity and the Racine Interfaith Coalition organized the noon event to bring greater attention to the issue, with state Reps. JoCasta Zamarippa, D-Milwaukee, joined by Reps. Tod Ohnstad and Peter Barca of Kenosha and other speakers who addressed the estimated 75-90 who attended.

 

Zamarippa has authored a proposal that would permit undocumented immigrants to obtain driver cards, which will serve as legal photo IDs and designed to be easily differentiated from Wisconsin drivers licenses. They will bear the phrase “not valid for voting purposes.”

 

Those latter items came about through discussions Zamarippa said she had with Assembly Speaker Robin Vos, R-Rochester.

She said dairy farmers and other business interests in the state “largely stand with us on the issue,” Zamarippa said.

Co-sponsored by Ohnstad, the bill is being circulated among legislators to get more to sign on as co-sponsors. Barca, the Assembly’s Minority Leader, likely will add his name to it in addition to the verbal support he has given the bill. However, no Republicans so far have signed onto it.

 

“The issue with Republicans not standing up and supporting it is the divisive immigration issue,” Zamarippa said, adding her Republican colleagues fear constituent backlash. At the same time, she said she has had “ a lot of great discussions” with Republicans indicating many appear open to passing such a bill.

 

“We must have allies in this fight,” Zamarippa said, first in English then in Spanish to the audience, more than half of which was Latino families. “It’s a public safety issue ... not an immigration bill. ... Whether you are a fifth generation Wisconsin citizen or a first year immigrant to America, this will benefit you.”

 

People who get drivers licenses in Wisconsin must meet the minimum age requirement, successfully complete written and driving exams and purchase driving insurance within 30 days. Zamarippa’s bill does not change that for undocumented immigrants.

They would be exempt from providing Social Security numbers to the Wisconsin Department of Transportation because, being undocumented, they can’t legally obtain Social Security numbers. However, they must declare their ineligibility to acquire a Social Security license when applying to WisDOT’s Department of Motor Vehicles for drivers cards.

 

People legally able to obtain the cards are more likely to buy insurance, which, along with needing to prove their driving knowledge through written and road tests goes to the issue of improving public safety, Zamarippa and others said Friday.

Said Barca: “There are some very compelling and important reasons to do this, apart from it being the right thing to do. People who don’t have drivers licenses and drivers cards can’t buy insurance. It helps all of us when people have insurance.”

Being able to drive legally will help undocumented immigrants get to and from their jobs, allowing them “to support their families with dignity,” Barca added.

 

Sandy Milligan, of Kenosha, president of the statewide social action organization WISDOM and longtime CUSH member, said the groups view the issue as a matter of their respective faiths as well as a matter of just treatment for all people.

Still, Milligan said, support from law enforcement leaders for the bill comes from their need to know exactly who is driving vehicles officers pull over and with whom they’re engaging in any number of police actions.

RIC’S Linda Boyle cited law enforcement support growing for the bill and encouraged supporters to contact their legislative representatives and “fill up their voicemail boxes every day.”

 

Please reload

Follow Us

I'm busy working on my blog posts. Watch this space!

Please reload

Search By Tags
Please reload